DoD Directive 8570

Issued in 2005 and titled “Information Assurance Workforce Improvement Program”

Any personnel affected by DoD 8570 must be trained according to the directive.

DoD Directive 8570 sets out to identify, tag, track and manage the information assurance, or cybersecurity, workforce and establishes a manual that includes an enterprise-wide baseline IT certification requirement to validate the knowledge, skills and abilities of people working in cybersecurity roles.

It addresses the contractors and entities of the DoD – including military and defense agencies – that provide IA (or cybersecurity) functional services for DoD information systems. The types of roles that DoD 8570 describes are those responsible for the protection of vital information that is in the nation’s interests.

Simply put, you have to be certified in order to access these jobs.

Every veterans’ path to certifications is solely dependent on what type of work you want to do throughout your career. Below we breakdown the different levels, categories, and roles each certification plays according to DoD Directive 8570.

DOD CERTIFICATION AREAS

Companies that hire IAT level positions include:

Information Assurance Technical (IAT)

The Information Assurance Technical certifications are geared towards roles that fix flaws, implement IAT controls, and perform basic security controls. They are broken down into 3 levels and categorized by system architecture, not the grade of the individual working in the area.

Below you can explore each of the 3 IAT certification levels as well as some example jobs that each level qualifies for.

Level I functions include such responsibilities as install and operate IT systems, apply security procedures, and enter assets into a vulnerability management system.

The following certifications fall under Level I functions:

  • CompTIA A+ CE
    Signifies that the individual is capable of performing tasks such as installation, configuration and troubleshooting of common PC systems.
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate Security (CCNA-Security)
    Demonstrates the skills required to develop a security infrastructure, recognize threats and vulnerabilities to networks, and mitigate security threats.
  • CompTIA Network+ CE
    This certification is suitable for those who wish to increase their knowledge and understanding of networking concepts and acquire the required skills to prepare for a career in network support or administration.
  • Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP)
    Demonstrates you have the advanced technical skills and knowledge to implement, monitor and administer IT infrastructure using security best practices, policies and procedures established by the cybersecurity experts at (ISC)².

Level II functions include such responsibilities as provide end user support, manage user accounts and analyze system performance.

The following certifications fall under Level II functions:

  • CCNA Security
    Demonstrates the skills required to develop a security infrastructure, recognize threats and vulnerabilities to networks, and mitigate security threats.
  • CompTIA CySA+
    This certification applies behavioral analytics to networks and devices to prevent, detect and combat cybersecurity threats through continuous security monitoring.
  • Global Industrial Cyber Security Professional (GICSP)
    This certification will assess a base level of knowledge and understanding across a diverse set of professionals who engineer or support control systems and share responsibility for the security of these environments.
  • GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC)
    This certification validates a practitioner’s knowledge of information security beyond simple terminology and concepts. GSEC certification holders are demonstrating that they are qualified for hands-on IT systems roles with respect to security tasks.
  • CompTIA Security+ CE
    This certification is aimed primarily at networking professionals, but because security is vital to all levels and job roles within an organization, it will also benefit PC support analysts, application developers and senior managers in accounting, sales, product development and marketing.
  • SSCP
    Demonstrates you have the advanced technical skills and knowledge to implement, monitor and administer IT infrastructure using security best practices, policies and procedures established by the cybersecurity experts at (ISC)².

Level III functions include such responsibilities as lead teams and support actions to mitigate problems and direct operational structures and processes.

The following certifications fall under Level III functions:

  • CompTIA CASP+ CE
    This certification validates advanced-level competency in risk management, enterprise security operations and architecture, research and collaboration, and integration of enterprise security.
  • Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP Security)
    This certification proves your skills with security solutions. To earn CCNP Security certification, you pass two exams: one that covers core security technologies and one security concentration exam of your choice, so you can customize your certification to your technical area of focus.
  • CISA
    Issued by ISACA, this certification is for people in charge of ensuring that an organization’s IT and business systems are monitored, managed and protected.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
    This certification proves you have what it takes to effectively design, implement and manage a best-in-class cybersecurity program.
  • Certified Enterprise Defender (GCED)
    Issued by GIAC, this certification assesses more advanced, technical skills that are needed to defend the enterprise environment and protect an organization as a whole. GCED certification holders have validated knowledge and abilities in the areas of defensive network infrastructure, packet analysis, penetration testing, incident handling and malware removal.
  • Certified Incident Handler (GCIH)
    Issued by GIAC, this certification validates a practitioner’s ability to detect, respond, and resolve computer security incidents using a wide range of essential security skills. GCIH certification holders have the knowledge needed to manage security incidents by understanding common attack techniques, vectors and tools, as well as defend against and respond to such attacks when they occur.

Here are some example jobs and salaries you can acquire with just a few IAT certifications:

  • Network Specialist:$59,000 median salary
  • Network Engineer:$77,000 median salary
  • Information Security Analyst:$85,000 median salary
  • System Engineer:$96,000 median salary

Companies that hire IAT level positions include:

Information Assurance Management (IAM)

The Information Assurance Management certifications are specific to more managerial roles. They’re expected to apply knowledge of IA policy, procedures, and structure to develop, implement, and maintain a secure computing environment.

Below you can explore each of the 3 IAM certification levels as well as some example jobs that each level qualifies for.

Level I functions include such responsibilities as manage operations of their computing environment (CE) system(s), ensure that system security configuration guidelines are followed, Recognize a possible security violation and take appropriate action to report the incident, as required, etc.

The following certifications fall under Level I functions:

  • Certified Authorization Professional (CAP)
    The only certification under the DoD8570 mandate that aligns with each Risk Management Framework (RMF) step. It demonstrates that you have the advanced technical skills and knowledge to authorize and maintain information systems within the RMF using best practices, policies and procedures established by the cybersecurity experts at (ISC)².
  • GIAC Security Leadership (GSLC)
    Demonstrates a practitioner’s understanding of governance and technical controls focused on protecting, detecting, and responding to security issues. It also shows a knowledge of data, network, host, application, and user controls along with key management topics that address the overall security lifecycle.
  • CompTIA Security+ CE
    Demonstrates the knowledge and skills required to install and configure systems to secure applications, networks, and devices; perform threat analysis and respond with appropriate mitigation techniques; participate in risk mitigation activities; and operate with an awareness of applicable policies, laws, and regulations.
  • CompTIA Cloud+
    Reflects an emphasis on incorporating and managing cloud technologies as part of broader systems operations. It includes new technologies to support the changing cloud market as more organizations depend on cloud-based technologies to run mission critical systems, now that hybrid and multi-cloud have become the norm.

Level II functions include such responsibilities as develop and implement IA policies, assist in gathering of evidence around computer crimes, and coordinate IA inspection and reviews.

The following certifications fall under Level II functions:

  • Certified Authorization Professional (CAP)
    The only certification under the DoD8570 mandate that aligns with each Risk Management Framework (RMF) step. It demonstrates that you have the advanced technical skills and knowledge to authorize and maintain information systems within the RMF using best practices, policies and procedures established by the cybersecurity experts at (ISC)².
  • CompTIA CASP+ CE
    Demonstrates the technical knowledge and skills required to conceptualize, engineer, integrate and implement secure solutions across complex environments to support a resilient enterprise.
  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
    Demonstrates expertise in information security governance, program development and management, incident management and risk management.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
    Demonstrates you have what it takes to effectively design, implement and manage a best-in-class cybersecurity program.
  • GIAC Security Leadership (GSLC)
    Demonstrates a practitioner’s understanding of governance and technical controls focused on protecting, detecting, and responding to security issues. It also shows a knowledge of data, network, host, application, and user controls along with key management topics that address the overall security lifecycle.

Level III functions include such responsibilities as prepare and oversee certification and accreditation procedures, cost benefit and economic reviews around IA policies, and analyze patterns of non-compliance.

The following certifications fall under Level III functions:

  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
    Demonstrates expertise in information security governance, program development and management, incident management and risk management.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
    This certification proves you have what it takes to effectively design, implement and manage a best-in-class cybersecurity program. With a CISSP, you validate your expertise and become an (ISC)² member, unlocking a broad array of exclusive resources, educational tools, and peer-to-peer networking opportunities.
  • GIAC Security Leadership (GSLC)
    Demonstrates a practitioner’s understanding of governance and technical controls focused on protecting, detecting, and responding to security issues. It also shows a knowledge of data, network, host, application, and user controls along with key management topics that address the overall security lifecycle.

Here are some example jobs and salaries you can acquire with just a few IAM certifications:

  • Information Technology Auditor:$61,000 median salary
  • Information Systems Analyst:$73,000 median salary
  • IT Director/Manager:$84,000 median salary
  • Director of Security:$91,000 median salary
  • Security Engineer:$98,000 median salary
  • Information Security Specialist:$116,000 median salary
  • Senior Project Manager IT:$118,000 median salary
  • Technical Lead Analyst:$123,000 median salary
  • Application Security Engineer:$132,000 median salary

Companies that hire IAM level positions include:

Companies that hire IAM level positions include:

Companies that hire IASAE level positions include:

Information Assurance Security Architecture and Engineering (IASAE)

The IASAE certification area covers architects and engineers who are responsible for designing and securing information systems architectures. They’re expected to know the best way to protect networks through the implementation of firewalls, virtual private networks (VPNs), antivirus software, intrusion detection/prevention systems (IDS/IPS), border gateways, switches, routers and more.

These 3 levels are broken down by experience with an IASAE I having no prior experience, IASAE II having at least 5 years of experience, and an IASAE III having a minimum of 10 years of experience.

Below you can explore the 3 IASAE certification levels as well as some example jobs that each level qualifies for.

The following certifications fall under IASAE Level I & II functions:

  • CompTIA CASP+ CE
    Demonstrates the technical knowledge and skills required to conceptualize, engineer, integrate and implement secure solutions across complex environments to support a resilient enterprise.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
    Demonstrates you have what it takes to effectively design, implement and manage a best-in-class cybersecurity program.
  • Certified Secure Software Lifecycle Professional (CSSLP)
    Demonstrates that the certified professional has the expertise to include the best security practices, auditing, and authorization into each phase of the Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC). SDLC phases include software design, implementation, testing, and deployment.

The following certifications fall under IASAE Level III functions:

  • CISSP-ISSAP
    The Information Systems Security Architecture Professional (ISSAP) is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) concentration area that focuses on roles that specialize in designing security solutions and providing management with risk-based guidance to meet organizational goals. ISSAPs facilitate the alignment of security solutions within the organizational context (e.g., vision, mission, strategy, policies, requirements, change, and external factors).
  • CISSP-ISSEP
    The Information Systems Security Engineering Professional (ISSEP) is a CISSP concentration area that recognizes your keen ability to practically apply systems engineering principles and processes to develop secure systems. You have the knowledge and skills to incorporate security into projects, applications, business processes and all information systems.

Here are some example jobs and salaries you can acquire with just a few IASAE certifications and varying levels of experience:

  • Application Security Engineer:$72,000 median salary
  • Security Architect:$78,000 median salary
  • Technical Lead Analyst:$87,000 median salary
  • Information System Security Engineer:$101,000 median salary
  • Cybersecurity Architect:$102,000 median salary
  • Data Architect:$127,000 median salary

Companies that hire IASAE level positions include:

Cyber Security Service Provider (CSSP)

The DoD Cyber Security Service Provider levels are broken down by job role. The 5 roles or levels you can work in under the CSSP certification are listed below as well as some example jobs & salaries.

The following certifications fall under the requirements for a CSSP Analyst role:

  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
    Professionals will be able to systematically attempt to inspect network infrastructures with the consent of its owner to find security vulnerabilities which a malicious hacker could potentially exploit. This certification helps you assess the security posture of an organization by identifying vulnerabilities in the network and system infrastructure to determine if unauthorized access is possible.
  • CyberSec First Responder (CFR)
    Demonstrates you have the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to deal with a changing threat landscape and will be able to assess risk and vulnerabilities, acquire data, perform analysis, continuously communicate, determine scope, recommend remediation actions, and accurately report results.
  • Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate
    Demonstrates the day-to-day, tactical knowledge and skills that Security Operations Center (SOC) teams need to detect and respond to cybersecurity threats. The certification validates the fundamentals needed for associate-level job roles, with one exam and one training course to help you prepare.
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate Security (CCNA-Security)
    Demonstrates the skills required to develop a security infrastructure, recognize threats and vulnerabilities to networks, and mitigate security threats.
  • CompTIA CySA+
    This certification applies behavioral analytics to networks and devices to prevent, detect and combat cybersecurity threats through continuous security monitoring.
  • GIAC Certified Intrusion Analyst (GCIA)
    Demonstrates a practitioner’s knowledge of network and host monitoring, traffic analysis, and intrusion detection. GCIA certification holders have the skills needed to configure and monitor intrusion detection systems, and to read, interpret, and analyze network traffic and related log files.
  • Certified Incident Handler (GCIH)
    Issued by GIAC, this certification validates a practitioner’s ability to detect, respond, and resolve computer security incidents using a wide range of essential security skills. GCIH certification holders have the knowledge needed to manage security incidents by understanding common attack techniques, vectors and tools, as well as defend against and respond to such attacks when they occur.
  • Global Industrial Cyber Security Professional (GICSP)
    This certification bridges together IT, engineering and cyber security to achieve security for industrial control systems from design through retirement. It assesses a base level of knowledge and understanding across a diverse set of professionals who engineer or support control systems and share responsibility for the security of these environments.
  • CompTIA Cloud+
    Reflects an emphasis on incorporating and managing cloud technologies as part of broader systems operations. It includes new technologies to support the changing cloud market as more organizations depend on cloud-based technologies to run mission critical systems, now that hybrid and multi-cloud have become the norm.

Here are some jobs that IAT Level I certifications qualify for:

  • IT Help Desk: $40,000 median salary
  • Desktop Support Analyst: $40,000 median salary
  • Systems Administrator: $78,000 median salary
  • Network Administrator: $71,000 median salary

The following certifications fall under the requirements for a CSSP Infrastructure Support role:

  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
    Professionals will be able to systematically attempt to inspect network infrastructures with the consent of its owner to find security vulnerabilities which a malicious hacker could potentially exploit. This certification helps you assess the security posture of an organization by identifying vulnerabilities in the network and system infrastructure to determine if unauthorized access is possible.
  • CompTIA CySA+
    This certification applies behavioral analytics to networks and devices to prevent, detect and combat cybersecurity threats through continuous security monitoring.
  • Global Industrial Cyber Security Professional (GICSP)
    This certification will assess a base level of knowledge and understanding across a diverse set of professionals who engineer or support control systems and share responsibility for the security of these environments.
  • Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP)
    Demonstrates you have the advanced technical skills and knowledge to implement, monitor and administer IT infrastructure using security best practices, policies and procedures established by the cybersecurity experts at (ISC)².
  • Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI)
    Demonstrates the candidate’s skills to identify an intruder’s footprints and to properly gather the necessary evidence to prosecute in the court of law.
  • CyberSec First Responder (CFR)
    Demonstrates you have the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to deal with a changing threat landscape and will be able to assess risk and vulnerabilities, acquire data, perform analysis, continuously communicate, determine scope, recommend remediation actions, and accurately report results.
  • CompTIA Cloud+
    Reflects an emphasis on incorporating and managing cloud technologies as part of broader systems operations. It includes new technologies to support the changing cloud market as more organizations depend on cloud-based technologies to run mission critical systems, now that hybrid and multi-cloud have become the norm.

The following certifications fall under the requirements for a CSSP Incident Responder role:

  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
    Professionals will be able to systematically attempt to inspect network infrastructures with the consent of its owner to find security vulnerabilities which a malicious hacker could potentially exploit. This certification helps you assess the security posture of an organization by identifying vulnerabilities in the network and system infrastructure to determine if unauthorized access is possible.
  • CyberSec First Responder (CFR)
    Demonstrates you have the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to deal with a changing threat landscape and will be able to assess risk and vulnerabilities, acquire data, perform analysis, continuously communicate, determine scope, recommend remediation actions, and accurately report results.
  • Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate
    Demonstrates the day-to-day, tactical knowledge and skills that Security Operations Center (SOC) teams need to detect and respond to cybersecurity threats. The certification validates the fundamentals needed for associate-level job roles, with one exam and one training course to help you prepare.
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate Security (CCNA-Security)
    Demonstrates the skills required to develop a security infrastructure, recognize threats and vulnerabilities to networks, and mitigate security threats.
  • Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI)
    Demonstrates the candidate’s skills to identify an intruder’s footprints and to properly gather the necessary evidence to prosecute in the court of law.
  • CompTIA CySA+
    This certification applies behavioral analytics to networks and devices to prevent, detect and combat cybersecurity threats through continuous security monitoring.
  • Certified Forensic Analyst (GCFA)
    Demonstrates that candidates have the knowledge, skills, and ability to conduct formal incident investigations and handle advanced incident handling scenarios, including internal and external data breach intrusions, advanced persistent threats, anti-forensic techniques used by attackers, and complex digital forensic cases.
  • Certified Incident Handler (GCIH)
    Issued by GIAC, this certification validates a practitioner’s ability to detect, respond, and resolve computer security incidents using a wide range of essential security skills. GCIH certification holders have the knowledge needed to manage security incidents by understanding common attack techniques, vectors and tools, as well as defend against and respond to such attacks when they occur.

The following certifications fall under the requirements for a CSSP Auditor role:

  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
    Professionals will be able to systematically attempt to inspect network infrastructures with the consent of its owner to find security vulnerabilities which a malicious hacker could potentially exploit. This certification helps you assess the security posture of an organization by identifying vulnerabilities in the network and system infrastructure to determine if unauthorized access is possible.
  • CompTIA CySA+
    This certification applies behavioral analytics to networks and devices to prevent, detect and combat cybersecurity threats through continuous security monitoring.
  • CISA
    Issued by ISACA, this certification is for people in charge of ensuring that an organization’s IT and business systems are monitored, managed and protected.
  • Systems & Network Auditor (GSNA)
    Demonstrates a practitioner’s ability to apply basic risk analysis techniques and to conduct technical audits of essential information systems. GSNA certification holders have demonstrated knowledge of network, perimeter, and application auditing as well as risk assessment and reporting.
  • CyberSec First Responder (CFR)
    Demonstrates you have the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to deal with a changing threat landscape and will be able to assess risk and vulnerabilities, acquire data, perform analysis, continuously communicate, determine scope, recommend remediation actions, and accurately report results.

The following certifications fall under the requirements for a CSSP Manager role:

  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
    This certification demonstrates expertise in information security governance, program development and management, incident management and risk management.
  • Information Systems Security Management Professional
    (CISSP-ISSMP)
    This certification demonstrates you excel at establishing, presenting and governing information security programs. You also demonstrate deep management and leadership skills whether you’re leading incident handling and/or a breach mitigation team.
  • Certified Chief Information Security Officer (CCISO)
    This EC-Council program is designed to bring middle managers up to the level of Executive Leaders & hone the skills of existing InfoSec leaders. The CCISO program was developed by sitting CISOs to train the next generation of leaders.

Here are some example jobs and salaries you can acquire with CSSP certifications and varying levels of experience:

  • Cybersecurity Policy Analyst:$83,000 median salary
  • Incident Response Analyst: $99,000 median salary
  • Cloud Software Engineer: $100,000 median salary
  • Penetration Tester: $121,000 median salary

Companies that hire CSSP level positions include:

Companies that hire CSSP level positions include: